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Research News

The health, vitality, resilience, and sustainability of the built environments we inhabit and engage rely on the discoveries and innovations coming out of the College of Built Environments. Check out the latest in BE Research Events and News below.


Earth as hybrid planet: New classification scheme places Anthropocene era in astrobiological context

For decades, as astronomers have imagined advanced extraterrestrial civilizations, they categorized such worlds by the amount of energy their inhabitants might conceivably be able to harness and use. Now, a team of researchers including Marina Alberti of the University of Washington has devised a new classification scheme for the evolutionary stages of worlds based on “non-equilibrium thermodynamics”…

Birds versus buildings

About one billion birds are killed every year when they unwittingly fly into human-made objects such as buildings with reflective windows. Such collisions are the largest unintended human cause of bird deaths worldwide — and they are a serious concern for conservationists. A new paper published in June in the journal Biological Conservation finds that,…

Moving Toward Zero: Q&A with Associate Professor Kate Simonen

What is the Carbon Leadership Forum and why is the group is relevant?   The Carbon Leadership Forum is a collaborative research effort between industry and academics. The group is focused on understanding and reducing the total life cycle carbon emissions in buildings. In particular, we study embodied carbon emissions—or the emissions that takes place…

RELEASED: Lean and IPD Case Studies Show Striking Uniformity of Project Success

Construction Management faculty, Dr. Carrie Dossick, joins colleagues from the University of Minnesota and the University of British Columbia in releasing findings from IPDA/LCI funded study. “The overall findings are consistent with the larger body of research showing that teams using IPD and Lean are more reliable in terms of the schedule and cost and in…

Cars vs. health: UW’s Moudon, Dannenberg contribute to Lancet series on urban planning, public health

Automobiles — and the planning and infrastructure to support them — are making our cities sick, says an international group of researchers now publishing a three-part series in the British medical journal The Lancet. University of Washington professors Anne Vernez Moudon and Andrew Dannenberg are co-authors of the first of this series that explores these…