Student Profiles

Information about current students


Recent Student Honors, Awards, Fellowships

  • Adnya Sarasmita: 2018 Chester Fritz Fellowship
  • Leann Andrews: 2016–2017 Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellowship
  • Shannon K. Tyman: 2017–2018 and 2016–2017 Project for Interdisciplinary Pedagogy (PIP) Fellowship
  • Barbara Rodriguez Droguett: 2015 Beca Chile CONICYT Government of Chile Scholarship
  • Daniel E. Coslett: 2014 CEMAT Research Grant (Centre d’Etudes Maghrébines à Tunis) dissertation research grant, Tunisia and Algeria
  • Julie Kriegh: 2014 AIA Upjohn Initiative Research Award—People + Energy + Place: Understanding Behavior in High Performance Buildings and Communities
  • Daniel E. Coslett: 2013 Ottenberg-Winans-Honors Fellowship (University of Washington African Studies Program), dissertation research grant
  • Julie Kriegh: 2013 AIA Upjohn Initiative Research Award—Tenant Engagement in High Performance Buildings and Communities
  • Amber Trout: 2013–2014 AAAS Emerging Leaders in Science and Society Fellowship
  • Shu-Mei Huang: 2011–2012 Dissertation Fellowship, Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange
  • Chiaoyen Yang: 2011–2012 Dissertation Fellowship, Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange
  • Chiaoyen Yang: 2011 Chester Fritz Endowment Fellow
  • Earlier student honors, awards, fellowships

Hamid Abdirad

Ph.C., University of Washington (2016)
M.Sc. Building Construction and Facility Management, Georgia Institute of Technology (2014)
MSc Project and Construction Management, Shahid Beheshti University (2013)
BSc in Architectural Engineering, IKIU (2010)

My research interests are Building Information Modeling (BIM), Design-Construction Integration, and Multidisciplinary Collaboration in the AEC/FM industry. I am specifically interested in quantitative assessment of BIM inputs, processes, and outputs in the practice, extending BIM applications in facilities management, BIM contracting, and BIM-enabled collaboration in integrated design-construction processes and IPD.


Leann Andrews

Ph.C., University of Washington (2015)
M.L.A., University of Washington (2013)
Certificate in Global Health, University of Washington (2013)
B.S.L.A., Ohio State University (2007)

My research focuses on understanding the intertwined relationship between human and ecological health and how we can design resilient landscapes to simultaneously and explicitly improve both. I am also interested in cross disciplinary collaboration, embracing complexity, communication, education and the role of play/happiness/delight/art in health.


Mark Bourne

M.S. in Architecture (History and Theory), UW (2014)
B.Sc. in Architectural Engineering, Khomeini International University (2010)

I am interested in the history and theory of Japanese built environments, with an emphasis upon traditional practice and sites, particularly Zen temple gardens, and architecture. I have additional interests in landscape design, native plant horticulture and native garden design, and Japanese history and literature.


Jonathan A. Childers

Ph.C., University of Washington (2016)
Master of Public Health, environmental and occupational health, University of Washington (2014)
Master of Urban and Regional Planning, environmental planning and policy, Virginia Tech (1999)
B.S. Biology, Virginia Tech (1997)

I am interested in environmental democracy and the material and social dynamics that interact to affect community well-being and ecological health. While completing my Master of Public Health degree at UW, I led projects for the Health Impact Assessment of the Cleanup Plan for the Duwamish Superfund Site in Seattle, and then evaluated the outcomes of that HIA. Research for my PhD in the Built Environment will build on that work, further considering the determinants and production of adaptive capacity, resilience, sustainability, and vitality.


Daniel E. Coslett

Ph.C., University of Washington (2013)
M.A., History of Architecture & Urban Development — Cornell University (2009)
B.A., Political Science and Classical Studies — Davidson College (2005)

My areas of interest generally center on the place of the historical within contemporary built environments. Through my work and teaching I aim to gain a better understanding of how surviving traces of the past are preserved, interpreted, and experienced today, and how they contribute to crafted urban identities. Related areas of interest include historic preservation, archaeology, tourism, and place branding. My dissertation project considers the role played by antiquity in the design and use of colonial and postcolonial Tunisian built environments during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.


M. Sadra Fardhosseini

M.S. Construction Engineering and Management, University of Nebraska, Lincoln (2016)
B.S. Civil Engineering, Power and Water University of Technology, Iran (2013)

My research interests are mainly about Building Information Modeling (BIM) and construction safety with a focus on hazard identification and risk assessment. Previously, I worked on safety research topics such as “finding the relationship between workers’ attention and accidents using the eye-tracking device,” and “workers’ safety in post-disaster recovery operations.” Currently, I am conducting research on designing a holistic safety training for construction workers by using virtual reality technology.


Naeun Gu

Ph.C., University of Washington (2015)
M.S., Housing & Interior Design, Yonsei University (2012)
B.S., Housing & Interior Design, Yonsei University (2009)

My primary interest is exploring how the built environment influences people's health and well-being. Through my research experience, I have come to believe that appropriate environmental settings can work as a strong health intervention. Specifically, my interest is in investigating what physical and social factors can affect health in the everyday living environment, with a focus on neighborhood and community design.


Chung Ho

LEED AP, U.S. Green Building Council (2014)
M.S. Structural Engineering, University of Texas, Austin (2010)
B.S. Structural Engineering, the National University of Civil Engineering, Viet Nam (2006)
B.Engr. Construction Management, the National University of Civil Engineering, Viet Nam (2005)

My research interest is lean construction, focusing on applying operations research to assist the management of construction prefabrication supply chain. I have other interests including project management, construction technologies, Building Information Modeling, and construction sustainability.


Mia Ho

M.S. Historic Preservation, University of Pennsylvania
M.A. Art History, National Taiwan University
B.Arch., Tamkang University, Taiwan

Research interests in preservation policy and preservation economics in the field of architecture/urban planning—a complex matrix of politics, economics, and architecture and urban studies in China at its national and local levels. Additional interests in urbanization and preservation in Asian cities.


Sara Jacobs

M.L.A., Harvard University (2012)
B.A. Architecture, University of California, Berkeley (2007)

I am interested in critical landscape history and theory, environmental knowledge production, and the politics of infrastructure and ecological representation. Other interests include speculative site methodologies, digital and analog mappings, landscape narrative, and material geographies of waste and decay.


Eyun Jennifer Kim

Ph.C., University of Washington (2015)
M.Arch. Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc)
M.A. English, City University of New York (CUNY)
B.A. English, Pomona College

Research interests in public architectural projects, memorials, power dynamics in architecture and planning, and opportunities for social justice in spatial design. Additional interests are post-colonialism, transnational identity, and phenomenology and performativity in the built environment.


Julie Kriegh

Ph.C., University of Washington (2015)
Passive House NW, member and training (2010)
LEED AP, U.S. Green Building Council (2008)
CSBA, Certified Sustainable Building Advisor Program (2007)
American Institute of Architects (AIA) (1992)
Registered Architect — State of Washington (1992)
M.Arch., University of Washington (1986)
B.A. Fine Arts, Duke University (1979)

I am a principal of Kriegh Architecture Studios, a member of the American Institute of Architects, a LEED AP, and a certified International Passive House Consultant, responsible for high performance building development at my firm. During my professional career I worked as an Associate for Weinstein | AU and at well-known architectural design firms NBBJ and the Miller Hull Partnership before founding my own practice in 2000. My projects have received awards and recognition from the AIA, NAARP, and AIA What Makes it Green, among others. I have received 2013-14 and 2014-15 Upjohn Research Initiative Grants and a 2014 Puget Sound Energy Grant for exploratory research on tenant engagement. I am also a 2014 UW Green SEED Grantee team member developing an energy audit tool; co-author of a 2015 American Planning Association national conference book chapter; and presenter at the 2014 National Living Futures Conference in Portland, OR, the International Passive House Conference in Portland, ME and PHIUS National Conference in San Francisco, CA. In 2015, I co-presented at the Pacific NW Passive House Conference in Seattle and the EDRA National Conference in Los Angeles. My current research is focused on understanding pro-environmental behavior in high performance buildings and communities. Key members of my dissertation research committee are Lynne Manzo, PhD, UW Professor and Environmental Psychologist (Chair); Joel Loveland, UW Professor and Director of the Center for Integrated Design; and Linda Steg, PhD, University of Groningen, Netherlands. With professional practice and academic research experience, I work to bridge both knowledge communities.


Wonil Lee

Ph.C., University of Washington (2014)
M.S. Civil Engineering, Carnegie-Mellon University, (2011)
B.S. Architectural Engineering, Yonsei University, Korea (2008)

My research focuses on the strategic management of construction workers’ physical strain and psychological stress and their effects on performance. For my dissertation, I am interested in understanding how task demands and personal resources affect construction workers’ performance and whether a mediating mechanism would exist in the relationship between job characteristics and workers’ performance.


Yue Liu

Ph.C., University of Washington (2016)
Master of Building Science, University of Southern California (2013)
B.Arch., Hunan University, China (2011)

Research interests include daylighting, energy conservation analysis in buildings, and building envelope systems.


Christopher Monson

Ph.C., University of Washington (2015)
M.Arch. (with distinction), Harvard University (1993)
B.Arch., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (1987)

My research interests focus on the contemporary problems of integrated architecture, engineering, and construction practices, particularly the communication processes and team workflows that support them. This work is at the intersection of AEC and the sociological and organizational theories that help identify and analyze the activities within professional practice collaboration. I am using qualitative studies to build theory and practice models for Lean Construction, sustainable design and construction, and integration across design, construction, and facility management. I am also working with technological constructs like BIM and COBie that form foundations for new kinds of collaboration.

I am a licensed architect, and have been a long-time educator in architecture and construction. I have taught design and construction studios, building detailing and assemblages, and architectural theory, and have been recognized institutionally and nationally for teaching excellence. My instructional research is focused on studio-based learning and design thinking. I am a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) accredited professional.


Aran Osborne

M. Bldg. Sci., University of Southern California (2009)
BASc. Mech. Eng., University of Toronto (2006)

Research interests in whole site integration, urban food production as the main focus for re-evaluating current design methods towards more sustainable/community-oriented modes, and incorporation of indigenous knowledge/values in design, methods, and processes. Also interested in permaculture and quantitative analysis methods and sustainability indicators for local food production, as well as computer simulation to evaluate energy efficient landscape design on resource consumption and food production on brownfield and grayfield sites.


Jeff Ottesen

Ph.C., University of Washington (2016)
BS Civil Engineering, Brigham Young University (1991)
MS Civil Eng, Texas A&M (1992)

Professional experience in civil engineering, planning, CPM scheduling, construction management and dispute resolution services. Research interests in advances in CPM scheduling and productivity analyses, and in construction law and contracts.


Lucky Pratama

M.S. Construction Management, University of Washington (2015)
B.Engr., Andalas University, Indonesia (2012)

I am interested in research related to emerging technology in the AEC industry, and looking for opportunities to conduct experiment-based research whenever possible, particularly research related to virtual construction or construction safety. I have additional interests in public-private partnerships, lean construction, and project delivery.


Barbara Rodriguez Droguett

M.S. Landscape Architecture Urban Ecology, State University of New York (2011)
M.P.A., Syracuse University (2011)
B.Arch. Building Technology, Universidad de Chile

My research interests lie at the intersection between building technologies and industrial ecology. In particular, I am interested in the application of whole building life cycle assessment to assess embodied carbon in the building supply chain and mass timber construction. Additionally, I am interested in understanding how big data and data science can contribute to enhancing design practice in the built environment.


Adnya Sarasmita

Ph.C., University of Washington (2016)
M.S. Urban and Regional Planning, University of Iowa (2014)
Sarjana Teknik (Strata I) Arch., University of Brawijaya (2010)

My interests include the resilience of communities in Indonesia to flood hazards, particularly on identifying community’s assets—social, economic, physical, human, and natural capital—understanding how they are being maintained, and how they are being used by the community to address the impacts of flood hazards.


Luming Shang

Ph.C., University of Washington (2016)
M.S. Construction Management, Columbia University (2014)
B.S. Civil Engineering, University of Jinan (2012)

I am interested in Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) and Project Financing. Specially I focus on the quantitative analysis of risk simulation, the optimization of risk allocation, and the design of PPP payment mechanism.


Holly Taylor

Ph.C., University of Washington (2015)
M.S. Architectural History/Theory, University of Washington (2013)
BA Anthropology, University of Washington (2002)

My research focuses on historic preservation theory and practice, particularly related to vernacular buildings and cultural landscapes. Specifically, I am interested in understanding how the intellectual framework that underlies public policy can better support the preservation of community gathering places and other historic sites that are significant for their contemporary cultural uses, social values, and roles in traditional economies. In addition to pursuing doctoral research, I am the owner and principal of Past Forward Northwest Cultural Services, a consulting business specializing in historic preservation research and heritage education projects.


Alexander Tulinsky

Ph.C., University of Washington (2011)
M.S. Architecture (history and theory), University of Pennsylvania
B.A. Political Theory, Michigan State University

The Pragmatic Urban House in Japan, 1965-75

In the second half of the 1960s a new attitude toward architectural design took shape among some younger Japanese architects, a shift of scale from the megastructure to the house, from future-oriented projection to the concrete reality of practice. I characterize this as a "pragmatic" tendency and focus on three exemplary figures: Azuma Takamitsu, Miyawaki Mayumi, and Suzuki Makoto. They and a few others were at the time regularly labeled a "new generation," but this tentative identification faded as the idea of "postmodernism" took architecture by storm in the later 1970s, and in the end no distinct historical category emerged. Revisiting this period I identify a design discourse that was in fact new, and a significant development in Japanese architecture culture. This was not a self-declared movement, indeed the architectural logic was at odds with that of manifesto-like declaration; it had a looser constitution, which is why I refer to it as a "tendency."

I use the term "pragmatic" as shorthand for how these architects were realistic about what architecture was capable of, and skeptical of architecture's aspirations to shape society. At the same time, this attitude did not discount creative invention or reduce architecture to questions of use, but rather found openings for creativity within the constraints of real-world projects. Most of these were urban houses, modest in scale—commissions obtained when these architects starting independent practices in the second half of the 1960s. In their house designs, the congested and chaotic city was treated as a given, an unfortunate limiting factor but not unsurmountable, and even with a positive side, generative of new possibilities.

This dissertation relates how the pragmatic tendency emerged in two registers, in built projects and in theoretical writings. To a degree I am deriving a theory after the fact, as a means of identifying a historical formation that was loosely-defined and short-lived—but nonetheless real. I also position these developments within a longer historical trajectory, within the disciplinary logic of architectural modernism and its purported "end."


Shannon K. Tyman

Ph.C., University of Washington (2013)
M.A. Environmental Studies, University of Oregon
B.A. Growth & Structure of Cities, Bryn Mawr College

My interests lie at the intersection of urban studies, environmental studies, and food systems. I use food and agriculture as a lens through which to explore issues of social justice, urban design, and ecological politics. My research is currently focused on the politics of alternative food movements. My experiences with and in the food system both academically and professionally inform much of my research. Among other projects, I have worked with the University of Oregon's Dining Services to identify paths toward sustainability and with Healthy Foods Here, a healthy food retail project in Seattle, WA. I have published research on food hubs and organic agriculture. In addition, I serve on the board of trustees of Central Co-op, a cooperatively-owned grocery store in Seattle. My hope is to incorporate principles of cooperative learning into my teaching pedagogy and expand the interdisciplinary conversation around food/ag studies and cooperative economies.


Supasai Vongkulbhisal

M.S. Arch. History/Theory, University of Washington (2016)
M.Arch. University of Texas (2012)
B.Arch. Silpakorn University (2008)

I am interested in the role vernacular plays in relationship with modernism and its post architecture: how modernist architecture truly intervenes with its environmental surrounding and what technology might have changed the continuity of each nation’s architectural culture.


Jerry Watson

My current Ph.D. research is investigating the history of transportation in the U.S. national parks. My research will explore from a historical and ecological perspective how to protect and preserve the park's natural resources, while accommodating the public's ability to visit the parks without causing irreparable harm. I believe a new strategy is required to address the critical transportation issues in these parks. I would like to formulate, develop, and evaluate a strategic model that explores alternatives to traditional modes of transport within national parks. There are three basic components of my research: conflict resolution, environmental ethics, and the ecological effects of roads (road ecology).

The main impetus for my decision to apply to the PhD program in the Built Environment, at the University of Washington is the opportunity to work in a program that offers me a unique opportunity to investigate the complicated problem of human-environment relationships. This will allow me to realize my belief that environments can be manipulated and planned to enhance the quality of people's lives. I believe that significant impacts on the development of sustainable responses to environmental challenges can best be achieved through education and research.

I currently work as a consultant for the National Park Service (NPS) in the Cultural Landscape Division at the Seattle Cascade Support Office and the Alaska Regional Office in Anchorage, Alaska. My work there focuses on the documentation of existing conditions, analysis and evaluation of the natural systems and features within park boundaries, and the formulation of a treatment plan that ensures the preservation and protection of the park's natural and cultural heritage. I am presently in the process of developing a treatment plan for Crater Lake National Park's Rim Drive in Oregon and the Dyea Townsite and Chilkoot Trail in Klondike Goldrush National Park, Skagway, Alaska.

I have served for the past three years as Professor David Streatfield's teaching assistant covering the full range of urban and landscape design history courses offered at University of Washington. These courses include both Ancient and Modern Landscape History, and the History of Urban Design.

I received my Masters Degree in Landscape Architecture and Bachelor of Arts in Asian Design at the University of Washington. The chairs of my dissertation committee are Professor David Streatfield and Professor Bob Mugerauer; members are Associate Professor Kristina Hill, and Professor John M. Findlay.


Zhenyu Zhang

M.S. Architecture and Civil Engineering, Chongqing University, China (2016)
B.Engr., Chongqing University, China (2013)

My research interests are integrating emerging information and communication technologies into the construction project management to increase collaboration between building supply chain entities, streamline the management process of sustainability and improve the profitability of sustainability initiatives. I am specifically interested in developing optimum implementation strategies of field ergonomics assessment in the construction industry to improve the industry’s capability of collecting ergonomic data and thereby inform the design of ergonomics intervention for promoting occupational health and welfare in construction.


Earlier student honors, awards, fellowships

  • Ozge Sade: 2009–2010 Fellow, Koç University Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations
  • Kuei-Hsien Liao: 2009–2011 Scholarship, Taiwan Ministry of Education
  • Chiaoyen Yang: 2008–2010 Scholarship, Taiwan Ministry of Education
  • Shu-Mei Huang: 2008–2010 Scholarship, Taiwan Ministry of Education
  • Meriwether Wilson: 2008–2010 Honorary Fellow, University of Edinburgh, School of GeoSciences
  • Kuang-Ting Huang: 2008–2009 China Studies Program Fellowship
  • Paula Patterson: 2008–2009 American-Scandinavian Foundation dissertation research fellowship
  • Jayde Lin Roberts: 2008–2009 Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad fellowship
  • Jayde Lin Roberts: 2008–2009 Gething Travel Award
  • Kuei-Hsien Liao: 2007–2008 Chester Fritz Endowment Fellow
  • Ashish Nangia: 2007–2008 Research Cluster funding from Simpson Center for the Humanities
  • Eric Noll: 2007 Public Humanities for Doctoral Students Fellowship
  • Ashish Nangia: 2006–2007 India Association of Western Washington South Asian Studies Scholarship
  • Paula Patterson: 2006–2007 Valle Scholarship, Finland
  • Jayde Lin Roberts: 2006–2007 Blakemore Freeman Fellowships for Advanced Asian Language Study
  • Paula Patterson: 2005–2006 FLAS Fellowship for French
  • Meriwether Wilson: 2005–2006 Henry Luce Fellowship
  • Paula Patterson: Summer 2005, FLAS Fellowship for Finnish
  • Jayde Lin Roberts: 2004–2005 FLAS Fellowship for Hindi
  • Paula Patterson: 2004, Kate Neal Kinley Memorial
  • Ken Camarata: 2003–2005 Gerberding Fellowship
  • Ken Yocom: 2002–2006 National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) Fellowship